People with a family history of alcoholism, especially women, have an elevated risk of also becoming obese, according to a new study. And the link between the two appears to be strengthening — the risk of becoming obese, for people with alcoholics in their family, is higher now than in the past, the researchers said.

The researchers said a possible explanation for obesity in those with a family history of alcoholism is that some individuals may substitute one addiction for another.

After seeing a close relative deal with alcohol problems, a person may shy away from drinking, but high-calorie, hyper-palatable foods could stimulate the reward centers in their brains, and give them effects similar to what they might experience from alcohol, the researchers said.

Read more...

New research shows that attending Alcoholics Anonymous meetings may increase spirituality and help decrease frequency and intensity of alcohol use Alcoholics Anonymous is a widely known 12-step program that can help individuals control their dependence on alcohol, and spirituality is a large part A new study shows that spirituality does increase over time, which can lead to better alcohol outcomes and an improved rate of recovery These results indicate that spirituality is an important factor in the multi-faceted recovery from an alcohol-use disorder Addictions, whether it is to drugs or alcohol, are a very difficult hurdle for individuals to overcome. But, there are ways to help people with their recovery through 12-step programs like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Many of these organizations, including AA, highlight spirituality as a very important factor, but the data surrounding its effectiveness have often been contested.

Read more...

Despite the existence of effective programs for treating alcohol dependencies and disorders, less than a quarter of people who are diagnosed actually seek treatment. In a recent study by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health researchers report that people diagnosed with alcoholism at some point in their lifetime were more than 60% less likely to seek treatment if they believed they would be stigmatized once their status is known.

Read more...

Alcohol ranks "most harmful" among a list of 20 drugs, beating out crack and heroin when assessed for its potential harm to the individual imbibing and harm to others, according to study results released by a British medical journal.

 

Read more...